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Taxonomy Term : Blended Learning

Measuring the effectiveness of blended learning environment: A case study in Malaysia

Authorship Details
Cho Cho Wai
Ernest Lim Kok Seng
Publication Details
Language: 
English
Resource Type: 
Article
Publication Date: 
Nov 2013
Publication Title: 
Education and Information Technologies
Publisher: 
Springer
Summary
Learning environment has always been traditionally associated with the physical presence of classrooms, textbooks, pen-and-paper examinations and teachers. However, today’s evolving technology has rapidly changed the face of education. Online learning, teleconferencing, internet, Computer Assisted Learning (CAL), Web-Based Distance Learning (WBDL) and other technologies are integrated in education. This blended learning environment has become the major role in training and education scene. This paper focuses on a set of quantitative data pertaining to the perception of blended learning, attitude towards technology, effectiveness and efficiency of blended learning by using path analysis. Data were drawn from a group of business students who were engaged in blended learning environment. This study intends to find out the effectiveness and efficiency of blended learning in Malaysia tertiary institutions. The empirical results confirm that blended learning does enhance student’s learning experience and learning outcomes. (Abstract by authors)

A blended learning model in higher education: a comparative study of blended learning in UK and Malaysia

Authorship Details
Chew, Esyin
Publication Details
Resource Type: 
Thesis
Publication Date: 
2012
Summary

Blended learning, involves the combination of two fields of concern: technology and education; or two groups of people: technologists and educationists. However, current literature shows less consideration on the potential disciplinary gap in the blended learning experience, as a result there is a paucity of evidence from cross-country/institutional/disciplinary investigations. This study aimed to explore, analyse and compare the blended learning experience in higher education. The research is reflected in 3 questions: (1) What are the current blended learning experiences in the selected higher educational institutions? (2) How such experience varies in different disciplines? (3) What are the reflections on the comparative experiences in (1) and (2)? The qualitative case study with comparative methods was used to obtain in-depth findings for these research questions. I visited 4 universities in two countries and sampled 51 research participants’ voices from contrasting disciplines. With these voices, I thoroughly discussed individual case studies, followed by a cross-case and cross-discipline comparison. These findings enabled insights to be drawn on a major argument: blended learning did enable and enhance learning experiences in all case studies but disciplinary differences remain a major challenge. The analysis shows that academics from science-based disciplines have an advantage at the instrumental level of technological usage without transforming learning experience; social science-based academics, due to their disciplinary nature, have embedded technology in wider trans-technical aspects that would enhance and transform learning and teaching. In the context of blended learning, I would argue that learning has not been enhanced (1) if the technology is the sole focus; (2) if the research effort of “technology enhanced learning” does not gain ground in educational theories and (3) does not recognise the disciplinary differences. Arising out of these findings, I proposed a blended learning model that indicates the boundary of the current literature and research findings, and a blended learning definition - an educational-focused process to enhance and transform f2f learning with the blend of technology in a symbiotic relationship. It is necessary for educationists and technologists to establish such a symbiotic relationship and the inter-disciplinary integration and discourse, that may impact on the individuals’ practice beyond their own disciplinary territory. (Abstract by author)

Notes
PhD thesis. University of Glamorgan

Blended learning : how to integrate online & traditional learning

Authorship Details
Kaye Thorne
Publication Details
Resource Type: 
Book
Publication Date: 
2003
Publisher: 
Kogan Page
ISBN / ISSN: 
0749439017
Call No: 
HF5549.5 T7Tho

Blended Learning and Online Tutoring : A Good Practice Guide

Authorship Details
Janet MacDonald
Publication Details
Resource Type: 
Book
Publication Date: 
2006
Publisher: 
Ashgate
ISBN / ISSN: 
9780754692515
Summary

The word ‘blended’ is not particularly scientific, or even academic. In fact, you might feel that it sounds rather more like an entry from a recipe book. At the same time, it is currently widely in use by practitioners in both academic and commercial sectors, and I believe it has some good common-sense value in bringing to the fore the wide variety and richness of situations in which learning takes place. It can encourage us to stop and think about the whole context of teaching and learning, so that we remember the human element in tutorials, or perhaps incidents such as chance meetings in the corridor, as critical parts of the package alongside any technology-mediated intervention with a group. (Extract from Blended Learning and Online Tutoring : A Good Practice Guide )

Moving Forward with Blended Learning (BL) as a Pedagogical Alternative to Traditional Classroom Learning

Authorship Details
Hisham Dzakiria
Che Su Mustafa
Hassan Abu Bakar
Publication Details
Resource Type: 
Article
Publication Date: 
Apr 2006
Publication Title: 
Malaysian Online Journal of Instructional Technology (MOJIT)
Volume: 
3
Issue or Number: 
1
Pagination: 
11-18
Summary

Globalisation and technology are altering our views on education and educational offerings.
Technology has given birth to many new avenues for learning. To name a few, online learning,
teleconferencing, the Internet, computer assisted learning (CAL), web-based distance learning
(WBDL) and other technologies currently exist. In turn, they have helped to coin the term
“blended learning” (BL), and although the term is still ill-defined, BL has entered into the
training and education scene and is gaining popularity. BL is no longer a fad but is now
expanding and getting established, although rapidly changing. When an institution makes the
critical choice of delivery methods, it needs to consider various factors. One in particular that
this article advocates is the need to understand the students as the primary educational client,
their perspectives and experiences, and the learning support mechanism for effective learning
outcomes. This qualitative study reports in some detail the experiences of a small group of
postgraduate learners as they progress through their Masters and Ph.D. courses at Universiti
Utara Malaysia (UUM), Malaysia. The paper looks at learning as described by the learners – it is
their story, their experiences and their perspective on graduate learning experiences at the institution. In
particular, this paper looks at BL and what that entails to the learners. From these findings,
conclusions have been drawn regarding the role of learning support to facilitate BL and the
provision of better educational experiences and outcomes at UUM. This article offers several
suggestions and a discussion on the broader applications of the BL framework and the readiness
of the UUM students for its implementation. (Authors' abstract)


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Latest updated: 23th July 2013

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